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Copycat

GARTHIsTheLaw

League Member
Joined
Jan 1, 2000
Messages
345
Points
0
Age
39
Location
Elsewhere
Website
www.acrn.com
Name: Copycat
Real name: James Kattman
Nicknames: The Cat; the Smartest Player in the Game
Height: 6’4”
Weight: 280 lbs.
Hometown: Kalamazoo, MI
Appearance: Shoulder-length brown hair; goatee; red boots and kneepads; red trunks with “THE CAT” on the back in black letters.

Entrance music: “The People That We Love” by Bush
Entrance: The lights go out for a second, then flicker on and off as the song begins. For the song's opening seconds, the video monitor shows only a flashing siren. When the drums first kick in, the monitor shows a sped-up version of Copycat running Dan Ryan down with his car. When the drums drop back out, the siren -- now with Copycat's dead eyes layered over it -- reappears. When the drums kick in again, the video monitor changes to the typical in-ring highlights as Copycat comes through the curtains. Copycat slowly walks to the ring, not acknowledging the crowd on either side of him, eyes fixated on the ring and whoever might be in it. When he gets into the ring, the lights stop flickering, though the music and monitor images continue until the bell rings or his opponent makes his entrance, as usual.

In-ring style: Combination of power and technical wrestling, primarily, with frequent cheating; he cheated even as a face, so as a heel, he’s even worse. Notably also is that one of the most enduring parts of Copycat’s gimmick – and pretty much the only reason his ring name still makes any sense – is that he has a huge arsenal of moves, eschewing only those that require physical strength beyond what he’s capable of (one-armed bodyslams, for instance) or agility beyond what he’s capable of (450 splashes, for instance), so he sometimes makes a habit of stealing his opponents’ moves.
Moves: Release German suplex, overhead belly-to-belly suplex, press slam, powerslam, running powerslam, frog splash, Samoan drop, delayed vertical suplex, Dragon sleeper, reverse DDT, inverted piledriver, Canadian backbreaker
Signature moves:
-Kit Kat Kick (savate kick)
-Scratching Post (upside-down Cat’s Claw against the ring post while the opponent is hung up in a tree of woe; this move takes him outside the ring, so he can’t actually win with it)
-Stray Cat Strut (after dropping the opponent in the center of the ring, usually with a press slam or spinebuster, he slowly bounces off the ropes, struts over to the opponent and drops an elbow to the chest)
Finishing moves:
-Cat’s Claw (half nelson combined with clawhold – can end the match via submission or via knockout)
-LitterBomb (high-impact running powerbomb)

Titles held: WWL World Heavyweight, WFW World Heavyweight, WWL Tri-American, WWL Television, FWF Tag Team (twice, with Black Cat as a team called the Cat Pack), EPW Tag Team (with Jared Wells)

Bio: Copycat’s been around for a while, so I’m going to give the abridged version of his exploits across his 13-year professional career.

<b>WWL:</b>
Copycat made his pro debut in WWL in the summer of 1996, being brought in essentially as an enforcer for wildly popular tag team Light & Darkness. After a series of fairly unimpressive singles matches, a wayward challenge by Copycat to then-World Heavyweight Champion Azeem Hardaway resulted in his winning the title under an extremely unlikely set of circumstances; the champion left the league and vacated the title just prior to what would have been a Triple Threat match against Copycat and a more deserving competitor, and Copycat managed to win, scoring a major world title just more than six months after his WWL debut. However, he would go on to lose the title in his first defense. In the summer of 1997, he managed to capture the league’s Tri-American Title, only to again lose it on his first defense, this time to Jared Wells. Following that loss, Copycat was pulled from WWL by his agent.

<b>WAR/ACW/WWL:</b>
Jumping to WAR after leaving WWL, Copycat competed as a solid midcard heel for a short while before turning face to join the Tri-State Terrors, a move that did nothing to get him out of the midcard. The highlight of his time with the league was probably a World Heavyweigh Title match against Madonna Wayne Grossard, which Copycat lost. He would eventually rejoin WWL, though the league closed before he really got a chance to accomplish anything. A brief run in ACW resulted in Copycat’s manager and longtime friend, Icekold, suffering a serious injury during a match between Copycat and Maelstrom, which did nothing to improve his motivation. His last match in WAR before that league folded was a loss to Jean Rabesque.

<b>FWF:</b>
Sometime in 1998, Copycat jumped to FWF and reignited his feud with Rabesque, though the circumstances of his debut quickly landed him in the tag team division, teaming with Black Cat as the Cat Pack. A few months after coming to the league, the duo managed to defeat the Mercenaries, a team loyal to Rabesque, to capture the FWF Tag Team Titles. A contractual dispute after their first few defenses resulted in their dropping them to the New Breed and falling off the radar for a few months. Upon their return with new contracts, they entered into a brutal feud with the New Breed that was regarded by many people as one of the league’s best, culminating in a pay-per-view scaffold match where the Cat Pack regained the titles. The team held the titles until the league suddenly shut its doors in the summer of 2000.

<b>Japan:</b>
After FWF closed, and after a few flirtations with other leagues that never went anywhere, Copycat went to Japan to hone his skills. He was there for about a year and didn’t really do anything groundbreaking, but the time gave him a chance to better develop his ring work, on which he had been focusing less of late due to his mic skills and overall goofiness becoming such a huge part of his success in FWF.

<b>WWL:</b>
Copycat returned to a resurrected WWL in early 2002 and quickly silenced critics who thought he would never rise beyond tag team competition again by tearing through a series of the league’s best to capture the vacant WWL Television Title in a tournament that culminated with Copycat besting King Krusher – though, in a continuing theme for Copycat’s success with WWL titles, he quickly lost the belt, this time to Shawn Hart. When Sean Edmunds took over the league shortly thereafter, Copycat found himself thrust into undesirable feuds with such WrestleCrap-worthy competitors as Damien Priest, but an unexpected effect of that was that the fans slowly began warming to him after his years of work as a heel. As a face, Copycat gained enormous popularity and quickly became the league’s hottest commodity. After scoring one of the biggest wins of his career over Nevada Smith, Copycat went into the WWL draft that would split the league into four separate circuits. With over 70 competitors in the draft, Copycat was picked No. 1. He became part of the CVWA roster, but the WWL split turned out to be a poor business move and the leagues quickly folded.

<b>Time off:</b>
After CVWA was dissolved, Copycat spent some time away from the ring. One of his interests since his time in FWF was music, and he did some work with a band that had served as part of his comedy act there. He also started exploring the world of acting, having done a few standard TV guest spots and bit parts in movies nobody cared about. Still, he had left wrestling on too hot a streak to stay away for long.

<b>WFW:</b>
Copycat signed on with WFW in the summer of 2003. With a solid, sustained fan backing for his new face status, his time there was met with great success and some tremendous matches with the likes of Scotty Michaels, Sean Edmunds, Jared Wells, Psycho and Anarky, as well as a highly entertaining partnership with El Arco Iris that saw the unlikely duo team up on numerous occasions. After drawing the ire of Anarky, Copycat soon found himself opposed by a faction known as L.O.V.E. consisting of Anarky, Psycho, Wells and Felix Red. Following a beating by that group, Copycat toned down the comedy, focusing instead on getting the respect he felt he deserved and going on an undefeated streak through some of WFW’s toughest competitors, starting with a special exhibiton “dream match” in which he defeated a similarly cerebral strongman in Dan Ryan. Though still opposed by L.O.V.E., Copycat’s quest for respect finally came to a head when he defeated Michael Manson to capture the WFW World Heavyweight Title. After a respectable reign as champion – his first with a singles title! – Copycat would lose the belt to Anarky. He was given a chance to regain it in a five-man match also featuring Manson, Larry Tact and Felix Red, but the league closed before the match was ever televised.

<b>Since then:</b>
After his last WFW experience in early 2006, Copycat returned to acting. With renewed focus on that facet of his career, better roles began coming to Copycat, and as his sabbatical from wrestling came to be several times as long as any of his previous ones, rumors naturally began to develop that he would not return to the ring. But Copycat had been saying for years that he wouldn’t just drift away from the business, and if that he were going to retire, he would do it in the ring. His return to the ring as part of the EPW roster is his first run as a contracted in-ring competitor in more than three years.
 
Last edited:

MikeyMassacre

New member
Joined
Oct 4, 2008
Messages
79
Points
0
Hey dude. I remember you from FWF and seeing you around the P* boards. I used to play as HELIX in FWF and am the Men of Constant Sorrow tag team here.
 

GARTHIsTheLaw

League Member
Joined
Jan 1, 2000
Messages
345
Points
0
Age
39
Location
Elsewhere
Website
www.acrn.com
Name: Copycat
Real name: James Kattman
Nicknames: The Cat; the Smartest Player in the Game
Height: 6’4”
Weight: 280 lbs.
Hometown: Kalamazoo, MI
Appearance: Long brown hair; goatee; red boots and kneepads; red trunks with “THE CAT” on the back in black letters.

Entrance music: “The People That We Love” by Bush
Entrance: The lights go out for a second, then flicker on and off as the song begins. For the song's opening seconds, the video monitor shows only a flashing siren. When the drums first kick in, the monitor shows a sped-up version of Copycat running Dan Ryan down with his car. When the drums drop back out, the siren -- now with Copycat's dead eyes layered over it -- reappears. When the drums kick in again, the video monitor changes to the typical in-ring highlights as Copycat comes through the curtains. Copycat slowly walks to the ring, not acknowledging the crowd on either side of him, eyes fixated on the ring and whoever might be in it. When he gets into the ring, the lights stop flickering, though the music and monitor images continue until the bell rings or his opponent makes his entrance, as usual.

In-ring style: Chiefly power and technical wrestling, with some brawling thrown in when appropriate. He’ll cheat when he has the opportunity, but nothing too sneaky or Guerrero-esque – just stuff like eye gouges, low blows and chokes, with weapons coming into play for longer referee distractions or no-DQ matches. Beyond that, one of the most enduring parts of Copycat’s gimmick – and pretty much the only reason his ring name still makes any sense – is that he has a huge arsenal of moves, eschewing only those that require physical strength beyond what he’s capable of (one-armed bodyslams, for instance) or agility beyond what he’s capable of (450 splashes, for instance), so he sometimes makes a habit of stealing his opponents’ moves. Given his current gimmick, he will never speak audibly in the ring (yelling at the ref, etc.) and will very seldom show any emotion, though he is only human and will still exhibit pain when appropriate.
Moves: Release German suplex, overhead belly-to-belly suplex, press slam, powerslam, running powerslam, frog splash, Samoan drop, delayed vertical suplex, Dragon sleeper, reverse DDT, backbreaker, Canadian backbreaker, spinebuster, pump kick, running elbowdrop
Signature moves:
-Kit Kat Kick (savate kick)
-Scratching Post (upside-down Cat’s Claw against the ring post while the opponent is hung up in a tree of woe; this move takes him outside the ring, so he can’t actually win with it)
Finishing moves:
-Cat’s Claw (half nelson combined with clawhold – can end the match via submission or via knockout)
-LitterBomb (high-impact running powerbomb; will sometimes execute this move as a standard sitout powerbomb if he’s tired or in a hurry)

Titles held: WWL World Heavyweight, WFW World Heavyweight, WWL Tri-American, WWL Television, FWF Tag Team (twice, with Black Cat as a team called the Cat Pack), EPW Tag Team (with Jared Wells)

Bio: Copycat’s been around for a while, so I’m going to give the abridged version of his exploits across his 15-year professional career.

WWL:
Copycat made his pro debut in WWL in the summer of 1996, being brought in essentially as an enforcer for wildly popular tag team Light & Darkness. After a series of fairly unimpressive singles matches, a wayward challenge by Copycat to then-World Heavyweight Champion Azeem Hardaway resulted in his winning the title under an extremely unlikely set of circumstances; the champion left the league and vacated the title just prior to what would have been a Triple Threat match against Copycat and a more deserving competitor, and Copycat managed to win, scoring a major world title just more than six months after his WWL debut. However, he would go on to lose the title in his first defense. In the summer of 1997, he managed to capture the league’s Tri-American Title, only to again lose it on his first defense, this time to Jared Wells. Following that loss, Copycat was pulled from WWL by his agent.

WAR/ACW/WWL:
Jumping to WAR after leaving WWL, Copycat competed as a solid midcard heel for a short while before turning face to join the Tri-State Terrors, a move that did nothing to get him out of the midcard. The highlight of his time with the league was probably a World Heavyweigh Title match against Madonna Wayne Grossard, which Copycat lost. He would eventually rejoin WWL, though the league closed before he really got a chance to accomplish anything. A brief run in ACW resulted in Copycat’s manager and longtime friend, Icekold, suffering a serious injury during a match between Copycat and Maelstrom, which did nothing to improve his motivation. His last match in WAR before that league folded was a loss to Jean Rabesque.

FWF:
Sometime in 1998, Copycat jumped to FWF and reignited his feud with Rabesque, though the circumstances of his debut quickly landed him in the tag team division, teaming with Black Cat as the Cat Pack. A few months after coming to the league, the duo managed to defeat the Mercenaries, a team loyal to Rabesque, to capture the FWF Tag Team Titles. A contractual dispute after their first few defenses resulted in their dropping them to the New Breed and falling off the radar for a few months. Upon their return with new contracts, they entered into a brutal feud with the New Breed that was regarded by many people as one of the league’s best, culminating in a pay-per-view scaffold match where the Cat Pack regained the titles. The team held the titles until the league suddenly shut its doors in the summer of 2000.

Japan:
After FWF closed, and after a few flirtations with other leagues that never went anywhere, Copycat went to Japan to hone his skills. He was there for about a year and didn’t really do anything groundbreaking, but the time gave him a chance to better develop his ring work, on which he had been focusing less of late due to his mic skills and overall goofiness becoming such a huge part of his success in FWF.

WWL:
Copycat returned to a resurrected WWL in early 2002 and quickly silenced critics who thought he would never rise beyond tag team competition again by tearing through a series of the league’s best to capture the vacant WWL Television Title in a tournament that culminated with Copycat besting King Krusher – though, in a continuing theme for Copycat’s success with WWL titles, he quickly lost the belt, this time to Shawn Hart. When Sean Edmunds took over the league shortly thereafter, Copycat found himself thrust into undesirable feuds with such WrestleCrap-worthy competitors as Damien Priest, but an unexpected effect of that was that the fans slowly began warming to him after his years of work as a heel. As a face, Copycat gained enormous popularity and quickly became the league’s hottest commodity. After scoring one of the biggest wins of his career over Nevada Smith, Copycat went into the WWL draft that would split the league into four separate circuits. With over 70 competitors in the draft, Copycat was picked No. 1. He became part of the CVWA roster, but the WWL split turned out to be a poor business move and the leagues quickly folded.

Time off:
After CVWA was dissolved, Copycat spent some time away from the ring. One of his interests since his time in FWF was music, and he did some work with a band that had served as part of his comedy act there. He also started exploring the world of acting, having done a few standard TV guest spots and bit parts in movies nobody cared about. Still, he had left wrestling on too hot a streak to stay away for long.

WFW:
Copycat signed on with WFW in the summer of 2003. With a solid, sustained fan backing for his new face status, his time there was met with great success and some tremendous matches with the likes of Scotty Michaels, Sean Edmunds, Jared Wells, Psycho and Anarky, as well as a highly entertaining partnership with El Arco Iris that saw the unlikely duo team up on numerous occasions. After drawing the ire of Anarky, Copycat soon found himself opposed by a faction known as L.O.V.E. consisting of Anarky, Psycho, Wells and Felix Red. Following a beating by that group, Copycat toned down the comedy, focusing instead on getting the respect he felt he deserved and going on an undefeated streak through some of WFW’s toughest competitors, starting with a special exhibiton “dream match” in which he defeated a similarly cerebral strongman in Dan Ryan. Though still opposed by L.O.V.E., Copycat’s quest for respect finally came to a head when he defeated Michael Manson to capture the WFW World Heavyweight Title. After a respectable reign as champion – his first with a singles title! – Copycat would lose the belt to Anarky. He was given a chance to regain it in a five-man match also featuring Manson, Larry Tact and Felix Red, but the league closed before the match was ever televised.

Since then:
After his last WFW experience in early 2006, Copycat returned to acting. With renewed focus on that facet of his career, better roles began coming to Copycat, and as his sabbatical from wrestling came to be several times as long as any of his previous ones, rumors naturally began to develop that he would not return to the ring. But Copycat had been saying for years that he wouldn’t just drift away from the business, and if that he were going to retire, he would do it in the ring. His return to the ring as part of the EPW roster is his first run as a contracted in-ring competitor in more than three years.
 

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